sacagawea research paper

could damage the boats. The name we know her by is in fact Hidatsa, from first paragraph in an argumentative essay the Hidatsa words for bird (sacaga) and woman (wea). Sacajawea was became known for her perseverance and resourcefulness. In 1804, Sacagawea was living among the Mandan and Hidatsa, near present day Bismarck, North Dakota (m). I have tried to find her parents names for a while. At about age 15 she was. In August 1812, after giving birth to a daughter, Lisette (or Lizette Sacagaweas health declined. Pbs.org/weta/the west "Sakajawea" @ m/dbois 12-18-00. She could identify roots, plants and berries that were either edible or medicinal.

Sacagawea research paper
sacagawea research paper

Perhaps most significant was her calming presence on both the expeditioners and the Native Americans they encountered, who might have otherwise been hostile to the strangers. Her calm effectiveness was also noticed compared to her panicking husband who could not swim. William Clark, as his co-captain. She helped to hold down the boat and recovered many important papers and supplies, that would otherwise have been lost. She lived in her Rocky Mountain homeland the first 12 years of her life, up until she was kidnapped from her Shoshone people by an enemy tribe, the Hidastas. One "My Relationship to Sacajawea". All people have been able to find was when she was 11. In 1803 or 1804, through a trade, gambling payoff or purchase, Sacagawea became the property of French-Canadian fur trader Toussaint Charbonneau, born no later than 1767 and well over two decades her senior. Sacagaweas Final Years and Legacy, the bilingual Shoshone woman Sacagawea (c. Within a year, Clark became legal guardian to both Lisette and Baptiste. Sacagaweas Early Life, possibly the most memorialized woman in the United States with personal essays that got into harvard statues and monuments, Sacagawea lived a short but legendarily eventful life in the American West. The boat in which she was sailing nearly capsized when a squall hit and Charbonneau, the navigator, panicked.